Home-Based Assessment Tool for Dementia Screening – The home-based computer software is patterned after the paper-and-pencil Clock Drawing Test

October 24, 2012

Source: Georgia Tech

Follow this link for the news story:  Science Daily  

Follow this link for the journal abstract: Hyungsin Kim, (2012) Home-based computerized cognitive assessment tool for dementia screening, Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments , Volume 4 (5) pp. 429-442

Date of Publication: 1st October 2012

Publication type: Website & Journal paper

In a nutshell:  Georgia Tech researchers have created a tool that allows adults to screen themselves for early signs of dementia. The home-based computer software is patterned after the paper-and-pencil Clock Drawing Test, one of health care’s most commonly used screening exams for cognitive impairment.

Georgia Tech’s ClockMe system eliminates the paper trail and computerizes the test into two main components: the ClockReader Application and the ClockAnalyzer Application. Click here to see a video demo.

ClockReader is the actual test and is taken with a stylus and computer or tablet. The participant is given a specific time and instructed to draw a clock with numbers and the correct minute and hour hands. Once completed, the sketch is emailed to a clinician, who uses the ClockAnalyzer Application to score the test. The software checks for 13 traits. They include correct placement of numbers and hands without extra markings. People with cognitive impairment frequently draw clocks with missing or extra numbers. Digits are sometimes drawn outside of the clock. The time is often incorrect.

Click here to watch the video demonstration of the Clock Reader image is on the right-hand side.

Length of publication: 12 pages

Supporting Information:

2012 Simple scoring of the clock drawing test for dementia screening

2010 Is the Clock Drawing Test a screening tool for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment? A systematic review


The village where people have dementia – and fun – Holland has developed an innovative, humane and apparently affordable way of caring for people with dementia

September 5, 2012

Source: The Guardian

Follow this link for the full story: The village where people have dementia and fun  and   Podcast

Date of publication: 27th August 2012

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell:   How is society to look after the ever-growing number of people with dementia? A curiously uplifting care home near Amsterdam may have the answers. Over the past few months, experts from around the world – Germany, the US, Australia, soon Britain.

Two core principles governed Hogewey’s award-winning design and inform the care that’s given here, says Van Zuthem. First, it aims to relieve the anxiety, confusion and often considerable anger that people with dementia can feel by providing an environment that is safe, familiar and human; an almost-normal home where people are surrounded by things they recognise and by other people with backgrounds, interests and values similar to their own. Second, “maximising the quality of people’s lives. Keeping everyone active. Focusing on everything they can still do, rather than everything they can’t. The cost is comparable to a standard nursing home facility, yet the rewards are priceless.

Dementia in a continually ageing population would mean the number of people is likely to double, to more than 65 million by 230, and treble 20 years later, as predicted by World Health Organisation.

In Britain, an Oxford University study puts the number of people with dementia at more than 800,000, rising to more than 1 million by 2025. We spend £23bn a year on caring for the condition in this country, double the sum we spend on cancer and three times that on heart disease. A quarter of UK hospital beds are now occupied by people with the condition.

In March David Cameron talked of a “national crisis”. As we live longer, and more and more of us develop the degenerative brain illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease, which are the most common cause of the condition, how society cares for people with dementia, he said, has become “one of the greatest challenges of our time”.

Length of publication: website pages