Home-Based Assessment Tool for Dementia Screening – The home-based computer software is patterned after the paper-and-pencil Clock Drawing Test

October 24, 2012

Source: Georgia Tech

Follow this link for the news story:  Science Daily  

Follow this link for the journal abstract: Hyungsin Kim, (2012) Home-based computerized cognitive assessment tool for dementia screening, Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments , Volume 4 (5) pp. 429-442

Date of Publication: 1st October 2012

Publication type: Website & Journal paper

In a nutshell:  Georgia Tech researchers have created a tool that allows adults to screen themselves for early signs of dementia. The home-based computer software is patterned after the paper-and-pencil Clock Drawing Test, one of health care’s most commonly used screening exams for cognitive impairment.

Georgia Tech’s ClockMe system eliminates the paper trail and computerizes the test into two main components: the ClockReader Application and the ClockAnalyzer Application. Click here to see a video demo.

ClockReader is the actual test and is taken with a stylus and computer or tablet. The participant is given a specific time and instructed to draw a clock with numbers and the correct minute and hour hands. Once completed, the sketch is emailed to a clinician, who uses the ClockAnalyzer Application to score the test. The software checks for 13 traits. They include correct placement of numbers and hands without extra markings. People with cognitive impairment frequently draw clocks with missing or extra numbers. Digits are sometimes drawn outside of the clock. The time is often incorrect.

Click here to watch the video demonstration of the Clock Reader image is on the right-hand side.

Length of publication: 12 pages

Supporting Information:

2012 Simple scoring of the clock drawing test for dementia screening

2010 Is the Clock Drawing Test a screening tool for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment? A systematic review


Focused Intervention Training and Support (FITS) – Care home training programme aims to reduce antipsychotic prescriptions

August 1, 2012

Source: Alzheimer’s Society  2012

Follow this link for the document

Date of publication:  2012

Publication type: webpage

In a nutshell: Alzheimer’s Society has developed the ‘Focused Intervention Training and Support’ (FITS), an evidence-based training programme designed for care home staff. The programme aims to train staff to deliver person-centred care to help safely manage behavioural symptoms as an alternative to using medication.

The programme was shown to successfully reduce the use of antipsychotics by almost 50% in comparison to usual care, without worsening behavioural symptoms.

Length of publication: 2 pages