Dementia Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 2 Issue 2

December 23, 2016

Rempods improve dementia care and patient experience

December 23, 2016

Source: The Academy of Fabulous Stuff

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Date of publication: December 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Rempods are pop up reminiscence rooms which were utilised across four elderly care wards at Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust. They are designed to help support “patients living with dementia to feel valued, empowered and more engaged with life.” Click here to visit the Rempods website.

Length of publication: 1 webpage


Hearing impairment and risk of Alzheimer’s disease: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

December 23, 2016

Source: Neurological Sciences

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: This meta-analysis found that age-related hearing impairment significantly increases the risk of cognitive impairment, although not of Alzheimer’s disease.

Length of publication: 7 pages.


Local health and care planning: menu of preventative interventions

December 23, 2016

Source: Gov.uk

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: Guidance

In a nutshell: “Public Health England (PHE) has worked with partners to identify preventative actions that can improve people’s health, support quality improvement and potentially save the NHS and the wider system money. This menu details interventions that are estimated to give a return on investment (ROI) and can demonstrate cost-savings to the health and care system over a 5 year period.”

Section 11 looks at healthy ageing, dementia and frailty and suggests the following interventions: midlife healthy lifestyle messages; Electronic Frailty Index (eFI); Dementia Friends; home adaptations.

 

Length of publication: 85 pages


Dementia rates show signs of falling

December 23, 2016

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: News story

In a nutshell: “There is growing evidence that the dementia crisis may not be as bad as first feared, say researchers.” Refers specifically to a journal article in JAMA Internal Medicine that showed that the proportion of people over 65 with dementia in the US fell from 11.6% in 2000 to 8.8% in 2012. The Lancet Neurology also published studies last year that suggested dementia rates also fell in the UK.

Length of publication: 1 webpage


Improving care for people with dementia: development and initial feasibility study for evaluation of life story work in dementia care

December 23, 2016

Source: Health Services and Delivery Research

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: A mixed-methods feasibility study showing that good practices in life story work (LSW) affected positive changes in staff attitudes towards dementia and, for some people with dementia, improvements in QoL. “These potential benefits require full evaluation. The feasibility work established the likely costs of LSW and highlighted the challenges of future evaluation in care homes and inpatient dementia care settings. LSW is used across different health and social care settings in England, but in different ways, not all of which reflect ‘good practice’. This large, complex study identified a wide range of challenges for future research, but also the possibility that LSW may help to improve care staff attitudes towards dementia and QoL for some people with dementia.”

 


Dementia Research – A Roadmap for the Next Decade.

December 23, 2016

Source: JAMA Neurology

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Date of publication: December 2016

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Abstract: “The last decade has seen extraordinary advances in our understanding of dementia. Unfortunately, much of this hard won science points to dementia being a complex problem. For example, genetic studies tell us that dementia is a heterogeneous group of diseases rather than a single clinical entity as we had previously thought. Epidemiological studies report a surprising decline in the occurrence of dementia, most likely due to improved lifestyle and cardiac health among the general population. This decline illustrates the multifactorial nature of dementia and, importantly, shows that at least a portion of it is amenable to intervention and preventive measures.”

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