Dementia Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 3 Issue 2

August 21, 2017
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Aging and dementia prevention

August 21, 2017

Source: Public Health England and The Lancet

Follow this link for Public Health England fulltext

Follow this link for The Lancet overview

Date of publication: March and July 2017

Publication type: Report and Journal article

In a nutshell: Both Public Health England and The Lancet have recently reviewed the dementia literature, and both conclude that modifying several health and lifestyle factors in midlife and later life can prevent dementia later. These include:

  • Physical and mental activity
  • Smoking
  • Hypertension
  • Obesity
  • Depression
  • Social isolation
  • Hearing loss
  • Education
  • Diabetes

Important Information: To obtain a copy of The Lancet article, you may need to log in with your Athens username and password, or contact your local NHS library or knowledge service.


The UK’s Memory First Project

August 21, 2017

Source: ILCUK

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: An independent think-tank has published a report outlining seven health innovations that could save the NHS £18.5 billion. Of these, The Memory First Project, contributes significantly to these savings. Memory First is an integrated dementia service run by a consortium of GPs across Staffordshire and provides “integrated care by bringing consultant led clinics into the community under the responsibility of their GP with support from secondary care expertise as required.”

Length of publication: 58 pages


Our healthcare assistant has created a dementia patient wristband that will be nationally trialled

August 21, 2017

Source: The Academy of Fabulous Stuff

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Wristbands with a ‘forget me not’ flower are now being used at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals to make it clear which patients have dementia.  The idea came from Allyson Rigby an Emergency Department Senior Healthcare Assistant and said: “The adaptation to patient wristbands alerts staff to use dementia training, ensuring person-centred care that’s adapted to their individual needs – preventing unnecessary distress.”

Length of publication: 1 page


A pilot study using “apps” as a novel strategy for the management of challenging behaviors seen in people living in residential care

August 21, 2017

Source: International Psychogeriatrics

Follow this link for abstract

Date of Publication: April 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This small-scale study compared apps to a control situation and usual care to determine whether apps were able to decrease challenging behaviours in residential patients, including those with dementia. This study suggestion apps “may be a feasible and personalized approach to managing challenging behaviors”, although a more rigorous study design is required. Staff involved in the study gave positive feedback, although they also said lack of confidence using the apps and time constraints may be barriers.

Length of publication: 7 pages


Service innovation through social robot engagement to improve dementia care quality

August 21, 2017

Source: Assistive Technology: The Official Journal of RESNA

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: Spring 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: “Assistive technologies, such as robots, have proven to be useful in a social context and to improve the quality of life for people with dementia (PwD). This study aims to show how the engagement between two social robots and PwD in Australian residential care facilities can improve care quality. An observational method is adopted in the research methodology to discover behavioural patterns during interactions between the robots and PwD. This observational study has undertaken to explore the improvement arising from: (1) approaching social baby-face robots (AR), (2) experiencing pleasure engaging with the robots (P), (3) interacting with the robots (IR), and (4) interacting with others (IO). The findings show that social robots can improve diversion therapy service value to PwD through sensory enrichment, positive social engagement, and entertainment. More than 11,635 behavioral reactions, such as facial expressions and gestures, from 139 PwD over 5 years were coded, in order to identify the engagement effectiveness between PwD and two social robots named Sophie and Jack. The results suggest that these innovative social robots can improve the quality of care for people suffering from dementia.” (Abstract from publisher)

Length of publication: 11 pages


Everyday converstaion in dementia: a review of the literature to inform research and practice

August 21, 2017

Source: International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This literature review examines everyday conversation in dementia. The literature advocates interventions that target conversation although a systematic evaluation is recommended. Additionally, the authors note that multidisciplinary dementia care practice has yet to be informed by the insights from this literature.

Length of publication: 15 pages


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August 21, 2017

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